Chronic kidney disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is kidney damage or reduced kidney function that lasts for three months or more and causes the kidneys to gradually stop working [28715][15040]. The most common causes of CKD are diabetes and hypertension. Other causes include:

  • glomerular disease (reduction in the kidney’s ability to filter blood)
  • inherited disorders such as polycystic kidney disease (cysts grow on the kidneys resulting in damage, which can also spread to other organs)
  • hypertensive renal disease (kidney damage caused by high blood pressure).

CKD is expensive to treat and has a marked impact on the quality of life of those who suffer from the disease as well as those who care for them [21677][19839].

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are admitted to hospital much more frequently for CKD than are non-Indigenous people [33151]. CKD-related deaths are higher among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than those among non-Indigenous people [31222]. However, since people with CKD often have other chronic diseases as well (comorbidities), particularly diabetes and cardiovascular disease deaths relating to CKD may be underestimated among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

References

Key resources

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Artwork

Watiya-warnu Jukurrpa (Seed Dreaming) by Evelyn Nangala Robertson

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