Eye Health

Poor eye health can limit an individual’s education, employment and social opportunities; it can also increase the risk of injury and lead to dependence on services and other people [33151].

While Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, especially those living in remote areas, often have better eyesight than non-Indigenous children [32347], Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults are three times more likely to experience vision loss or blindness than non-Indigenous adults [32155].

Uncorrected refractive error, cataracts and diabetic retinopathy are the main causes of vision loss and blindness among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people [32155], but trachoma and trichiasis also occur in some remote communities despite no longer being a public health problem in any other developed country in the world [34288].

The good news is that 90% of vision loss and blindness among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is preventable or treatable, and there are positive signs that eye health initiatives are closing the vision gap [32155].

References

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Key resources

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Artwork

Life before the drought by Julie Weekes

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should be aware that this website may contain images, voices and names of people who have passed away.
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